New Directions in Philosophical Theology

I have received a £174,000 ($230,000) grant from the Templeton Religion Trust to lead a two-year research project entitled ‘New Directions in Philosophical Theology’.

The aim of the project is to lay the groundwork for a field-shaping programme of research in philosophical theology, defined as a theology resourced by methods and insights from within systematic theology and continental philosophy. It plans to do so (a) by building relationships with theological centres and outstanding individual researchers that already engage continental philosophy constructively for theological advancement, and (b) by formulating a shared understanding of the tasks and questions that should be prioritized over the subsequent c. five years in the field of philosophical theology.

The project will be based here at St Andrews, and draw on the School of Divinity’s rich expertise in systematic theology and continental philosophy, as well as its flourishing work in the neighbouring field of analytic theology.

If you are with an institution that works in the area outlined above, and would like to be involved, please get in touch with me.

The University of St Andrews is now hiring a two-year research fellow to work with this project. Please consider or pass on the advertisement to potential candidates.

Reading R.M. Rilke & T.S. Eliot Theologically and Philosophically

In March 2019, Thomas Pfau (Duke) and I convened a four-day colloquium gathering a small group of theologians, philosophers, literary scholars and poets to read R.M. Rilke’s Duino Elegies and T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets together and discuss their theological and philosophical dimensions.

 

Left to right: Kevin Hart (Virginia), David Wellbery (Chicago), Malcolm Guite (Cambridge), Judith Wolfe (St Andrews), Rowan Williams (Cambridge), Thomas Pfau (Duke). Not pictured: Christoph Schwöbel (St Andrews), Gavin Hopps (St Andrews)

 

Just out…

A number of new articles and talks have recently been published online:

‘The Eschatological Turn in German Philosophy’Modern Theology 35, no 1 (January 2019),  https://doi.org/10.1111/moth.12460

‘The Philosophy of Hope’, panel discussion with Melvyn Bragg (host), Beatrice Han-Pile, and Robert Stern, on In Our Time, BBC Radio 4, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00017vl

‘Religious Aspects of Heidegger’s Black Notebooks’, podcast of a lecture given in Lund, Sweden, as part of a colloquium entitled Heidegger and Theology – After the Black Notebookshttps://religionochteologi.podbean.com/e/judith-wolfe-religious-aspects-of-the-black-notebooks/

‘Martin Heidegger and Catholicism: The Unexpected Enemy in the Black Notebooks’, a brief piece for The Tablet, now re-posted on The Roundel, the blog of Systematic & Historical Theology at St Andrews.

The author-accepted manuscript of another article, entitled ‘The End of Images: Towards a Phenomenology of Eschatological Expectation’, to be published in 2019 in a book entitled Image as Theology, will be available shortly in the University of St Andrews’ research repository, PURE.

Oxford Handbook of 19th-Century Christian Thought

ohb19c-cover

OUP has just announced the Oxford Handbook of Nineteenth-Century Christian Thought, to be published in June 2017, on which Joel Rasmussen, Johannes Zachhuber and I have been working for the last four years. Visit the catalogue or see the Table of Contents below.

Table of Contents

List of contributors
Introduction, Joel D. S. Rasmussen, Judith Wolfe, and Johannes Zachhuber
Part I: Changing Paradigms
1: The Transformation of Metaphysics, Joel D. S. Rasmussen
2: Political Transformations, Mark Chapman
3: The History Turn, Johannes Zachhuber
4: Criticism and Authority, David Lincicum
5: The Science of Life, Donovan O. Schaefer
Part II: Human Nature and the Nature of Religion
6: Immanence and Transcendence, Merold Westphal
7: Selfhood and Relationality, Jacqueline Mariña
8: Gender, Lori Pearson
9: Faith and Reason, Russell Re Manning
10: Experience, Simeon Zahl
11: Myth, George S. Williamson
12: Virtue and Character, Paul Martens
Part III: Culture and Society
13: State and Church, Ian Tregenza
14: The Nation and Nationalism, Halvor Moxnes
15: Capitalism and Socialism, Philip Lockley
16: Mission and Colonialism, Michael Gladwin
17: Education and Its Institutions, Zachary Purvis
18: Recreation and Leisure, Paul Heintzman
19: Other Religions, Bernhard Maier
20: Race and Emancipation, Martin Halliwell
21: The Natural World, Malcolm Clemens Young
22: War, James Turner Johnson
Part IV: Christianity and the Arts
23: The Novel, Andrew Tate
24: Poetry, Rosalind Powell
25: Theatre, Linzy Brady and Jolyon Mitchell
26: Painting, George Pattison
27: Music, Bennett Zon
28: Architecture, William Whyte
Part V: Christianity and Christianities
29: Roman Catholicism, Daniel Menozzi
30: Protestantism, Annette G. Aubert
31: Anglicanism, Frances Knight
32: Orthodoxy, Norman Russell
33: Christian Minorities, Peter Lineham
Part VI: Doctrinal Themes
34: God, Richard H. Roberts
35: Christ, Robert Morgan
36: Church, Shao Kai Tseng
37: Scripture, William J. Abraham
38: Sin and Reconciliation, Paul T Nimmo
39: Life in the Spirit, Peter C. Hodgson
40: Eschatology, Judith Wolfe